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Norfolk Botanical Garden Eagles • View topic - Retreival of eaglet for examination - 22 May 2008

Norfolk Botanical Garden Eagles

NESTI (Norfolk Eagle Support Team International)
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 2009 8:27 pm 
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Location: Shenandoah Valley
wvec-moderator:Welcome to the Eagle cam special events chat room. We will be having a Norfolk Botanical Gardens staff member giving us a
play by play of the extraction of the eaglet. This will begin whenever they are ready at the nest. Thanks for joining us today.
Norfolk Botanical: Good morning and welcome to the Norfolk Botanical Garden Eagle Cam. Today we will witness the retrieval of the eaglet and part of the exam by the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries veterinarian.
Norfolk Botanical: At this time we are still waiting for the vet to arrive - there is a back up at the tunnel and he is coming from Richmond
Norfolk Botanical:Several days ago a growth was noticed on the eaglet’s bill. Since then it has grown fairly rapidly. Because of the concern, an examination has been scheduled to evaluate the bird.
Norfolk Botanical: One possibility for the growth is Avian Pox. However, there is also some reason to doubt this diagnosis and the primary purpose of the examination is to evaluate the growth and to determine a possible cause.
Norfolk Botanical: Please be aware we will not actually observe the biopsy performed upon the eaglet.
Norfolk Botanical: Dr Jonathan Sleeman is the vet performing the examination today. He works with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.
Norfolk Botanical: Currently you can see an adult on the same tree as the cam
Norfolk Botanical: You can see a lot of staff and some visitors waiting outside the exclusion area
Norfolk Botanical: We are still waiting for Dr. Sleeman to arrive - Hampton Roads traffic
Norfolk Botanical: Chesapeake Bay Region bald eagle concentration areas, particularly those in Virginia, are probably the most important bald eagle habitat east of the Mississippi River. The tidal rivers of Virginia and Maryland are extensively used by southern and northern migrant eagles for foraging, roosting, and molting
Norfolk Botanical: While we wait I will share some information on Bald Eagles
Norfolk Botanical: As of 2007 nearly 550 nesting pairs in VA's coastal plain.
Norfolk Botanical: Bald eagles, like other raptors, are birds of prey. They usually seek out aquatic habitats (bays, lakes, large rivers), as fish are their preferred food, but bald eagles are opportunistic foragers.
Norfolk Botanical: Bald eagles were protected under the Bald Eagle Protection Act in 1940 in Alaska and lower 48 states. The Act prohibited taking or possession of bald eagles or any parts including feathers, eggs, and nests.
Norfolk Botanical: Bald eagles will continue to be protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. But future growth of their populations, both in Virginia and across the country, may be constrained by the loss of protection of potential nest sites and suitable bald eagle habitat as a result of Federal de-listing.
Norfolk Botanical: Because of its rich food resources, Chesapeake Bay also is host to a large influx of summer migrants from Florida and other Gulf Coast states from May to September
Norfolk Botanical: Most immatures on the Chesapeake Bay limit movements to the bay. Less than 10% of radio-tagged individuals moved north in summer.
Norfolk Botanical: Chesapeake Bay Region bald eagle concentration areas, particularly those in Virginia, are probably the most important bald eagle habitat east of the Mississippi River. The tidal rivers of Virginia and Maryland are extensively used by southern and northern migrant eagles for foraging,
Norfolk Botanical:You can see a number of photographers and staff waiting for the examination to start Norfolk Botanical: I have just received word that the vet has arrived
Norfolk Botanical: Also attending today is Stephen Living, Wildlife Biologist, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and Reese Lukei of William & Mary’s Center for Conservation Biology
Norfolk Botanical: In a moment the tree climbers will get in position to climb the tree
Norfolk Botanical: Here comes the truck
Norfolk Botanical:/ Climbing the tree today is Tim Nuckols and Nate Jones of Nuckols Tree Service and Chad Peevey from ODU
Norfolk Botanical: The bucket will be going up shortly
Norfolk Botanical: They will lift the bucket to its highest reach and then use ropes to climb the nest
Norfolk Botanical: They are loading up a bag to place the eaglet in when they get to the nest
Norfolk Botanical: The maximum reach of the buckt is 55 feet. The rest of the way is man and rope
Norfolk Botanical: He is tossing the first line up to climb
Norfolk Botanical: The maximum reach of the buckt is 55 feet. The rest of the way is man and rope
Norfolk Botanical: He is tossing the first line up to climb
Norfolk Botanical: Safety, is a major concern so they will proceed cautiously
Norfolk Botanical: Right now the climber is moving up the branches and is just below and to the right of the nest
Norfolk Botanical: They will come up on the east side of the nest
Norfolk Botanical: The eagle has spotted Nate
Norfolk Botanical: The parents are circling low overhead - over NATO tower and the nest
Norfolk Botanical: Nate is still securing ropes
Norfolk Botanical: Tim is coming up in the bucket now
Norfolk Botanical: Nate is securing ropes for lowering the eagle to the ground
Norfolk Botanical: Tim Nuckols in getting to the nest soon
Norfolk Botanical: The parents continue to circle
Norfolk Botanical: Nate has the rope ready to lower the eaglet
Norfolk Botanical: They will put the eaglet in the blue bag and then lower it to the bucket truck
Norfolk Botanical: Chad Peevey is in the truck and then will bring the eaglet down
Norfolk Botanical: Tim is grabbing the eagle and they will put it in the bag
Norfolk Botanical: Nate is getting ready to secure the bag to the rope
Norfolk Botanical: Chad has got the bag
Norfolk Botanical: Chad removed the rop
Norfolk Botanical: The bag is handed to Steven Living
Norfolk Botanical: They are examing the eagle
Norfolk Botanical: They are photographing the eaglet
Norfolk Botanical: They are doing a visual inspection of them
Norfolk Botanical: They are showing the eaglet to the media
Norfolk Botanical: Photo opportunity for the media
Norfolk Botanical: The growth appears to have grown rapidly in the last few days
Norfolk Botanical:They are getting ready to do the biopsy and I am working with Nuckols to make sure the nest view is clear
Norfolk Botanical: Twigs that have been in the way of the cam have been removed and others are being adjusted
Norfolk Botanical: The parents are circling very high over the nest out of our viewing range
Norfolk Botanical: This pair of eagles first built a nest in Norfolk Botanical Garden in the fall of 2003.
Norfolk Botanical: At the end of the last nesting season their nest collapsed and the eagles built the new nest in its current location.
Norfolk Botanical: They have successfully raised young in their previous years at the garden.
1 in 2004
2 in 2005
3 in 2006
3 in 2007
Norfolk Botanical: This year has been a difficult year for our pair. After laying two eggs, they were chased from the nest and the eggs abandoned. With proper permits, the eggs were removed. The pair returned and laid two more eggs. These eggs were broken in an early morning disturbance that alarmed the mother and caused her to step on and break the eggs. A few days later the mother laid the third egg of the se
Norfolk Botanical: third egg of the second clutch. This egg hatched and is the eaglet we see today.
Norfolk Botanical: The eagle cam is a partnership of Norfolk Botanical Garden, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and WVEC-TV
Norfolk Botanical: The vet and biologists continue to examine the eaglet
Norfolk Botanical: Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF) is responsible for the management of inland fisheries, wildlife, and recreational boating for the Commonwealth of Virginia. The agency is responsible for the management in of Bald Eagles in Virginia.
Norfolk Botanical: Through the partnership VDGIF has provided the camera equipment and lighting equipment and additional logistical support.
Norfolk Botanical: NBG provides protection for the eagles and has provided the transmission equipment for the webcam. Garden staff also maintains the feed to WVEC for the cam.
Norfolk Botanical: The eaglet will not be going back into the nest today
Norfolk Botanical: The eaglet will not be going back into the nest today
Norfolk Botanical: The eaglet will be taken to a rehabilitation center
Norfolk Botanical: it will probably be to the Wildlife Center of VA at Lyndhurst (near Waynesboro). What the course of treatment will be depends on the extent disease.
Norfolk Botanical: Dr Jonathan Sleeman is the vet performing the examination today. He works with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.
Norfolk Botanical: The growth seems large and agressive and is starting to interfere with his breathing on his left nostril
Norfolk Botanical: It may interfere with eating soon
Norfolk Botanical: He will be taken for care in Wildlife Center of VA at Lyndhurst (near Waynesboro)
Norfolk Botanical: He is being put in a transport box now
Norfolk Botanical: They have taken tissue samples and will send to make a correct diagnosis
Norfolk Botanical: Blood samples were taken as well
Norfolk Botanical: The parents continue to soar high, but over towards the lake at the moment
Norfolk Botanical: Thank you for coming to the Garden today and we will continue to monitor activities this morning
Norfolk Botanical: They are leaving with teh eagle now
Norfolk Botanical: The eaglet will travel with Dr. Sleeman - it is being loaded into his vehicle
Norfolk Botanical: VDGIF biologist will address the media about the situation.
Norfolk Botanical: Biologist is Stephen Living
Norfolk Botanical: He will also post more details in his blog at the VDGIF site
Norfolk Botanical: According the vet - the mass is growing rapidly and needs an operation
Norfolk Botanical: It is not sure that this is Avian Pox - the mass has grown faster than thought
Norfolk Botanical: Ideal treatment would include removal of mass and complete recovery and release to the wild
Norfolk Botanical: the baby will not likely be returned to the nest - recovery will probably take too long but release will most likely be in this area
Norfolk Botanical: Biopsy was taken from the tip of the mass
Norfolk Botanical: Parents may show some stress but these birds have proved resilient and should return to normal in a few days. Will continue to hunting in the area
Norfolk Botanical: These were comments made by Dr. Sleemand and Stephen Living
Norfolk Botanical: The mandible was starting to become deformed due to mass and needed care
Norfolk Botanical: The adults will hang around for several days before leaving the nesting site
wvec-moderator: Thank you to the Norfolk Botanical Garden staff for giving us the play by play of the events this morning.
Norfolk Botanical:Dr. Sleeman does not think this is avion pox
Norfolk Botanical: This has a larger mass than avian pox
Norfolk Botanical: He will wait to see what lab results are before stating disease
Norfolk Botanical: He will ask that the testing be expidited
Norfolk Botanical: Thank you to WVEC and VDGIF for their help in this project
Norfolk Botanical: Press conference is over and people are leaving the site
Norfolk Botanical: Viewers have been invited to list their hometown on the “Who’s Watching” page of the Norfolk Botanical Garden website.
http://www.norfolkbotanicalgarden.org/c ... wers.shtml
To date viewers from 49 states (anybody from North Dakota?) and 18 countries have witnessed our eagle pair raising young.
Norfolk Botanical: We invite you to add your town to the list
Norfolk Botanical: Thank you everyone for your interest and watching the eagles
wvec-moderator: Thank you to the Norfolk Botanical Garden staff for giving us the play by play of the events this morning.

_________________
For the animals shall not be measured by man ~ They are not our brethren, they are not underlings: they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendor and travail of the earth ~ Henry Beston


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