[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file [ROOT]/includes/session.php on line 2208: Array to string conversion
Norfolk Botanical Garden Eagles • View topic - Ed Clark Q&A Transcript - June , 2010

Norfolk Botanical Garden Eagles

NESTI (Norfolk Eagle Support Team International)
It is currently Tue Nov 21, 2017 12:20 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 3:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 7:50 pm
Posts: 3913
Location: Shenandoah Valley
First, let me thank the good folks at WVEC, DGIF and NBG for inviting me to participate in this blog. To all who have submitted questions in advance, we’ll sure do our best to answer as many as possible. I will beg your forgiveness in advance for typos or misspellings. I’m pretty fast on the keyboard, but the faster I go, the more the likelihood of a goof-up. Before you believe anything that seems totally outrageous, consider the possibility that it is the combination of fast fingers and slow brain.

WCV was founded in 1982 to be a local wildlife clinic.. We had no idea we would become one of the world's leading wildlife hospitals....an overnight success in 27 short years~!

We have about 20 staff in all Departments. We have treated over 55,000 animals, but our mission is actually to teach others to care about and care for and wildlife and the environment.

For us, fixing an animal is not enough. We want to know why it was hurt and how to prevent that from happening again.
We are proud of the fact that WCV was named the Conservation Organization of the Year for the entire US in 2007.

Today, we want to concentrate on eagles, our work with them, and of course, Buddy!

So, why don't we take the first question..


what are he leading causes for eagles becoming patients?
by crackerjack
We see eagle as a result of many factors: gunshot wounds, pesticide and environmental contaminants, collisions with vehicles and power lines, and from general emaciation....the result of not being able to feed themselves.

what proportion of our eagle patients become releasable?
by crackerjack

It used to be that gunshot was the most common injury, but now, eagle fights have jumped up on the list.

We are able to release roughly one in three of our eagle patients, but that is a very general estimate. We cannot predict what will come in the door.

Is the Center private or public? Does the government oversea it or the state of VA?
by Kara
We are NOT your tax dollars at work. We operate on about 1 million dollars of private funding annually. We must have federal and state permits, but we have no close oversight beyond that.

what are your biggest categories of expense, and of income?
by crackerjack
Right now, our veterinary and veterinary training programs consume about 2/3 of our budget, with education taking another big chunk. We are very proud of the fact that our fundraising and administrative costs are extremely low, earning us the highest 4-star rating from Charity Navigator

Will the center be able to receive wildlife from the Louisiana coast and help them? Can they be released in the Virginia area and survive away from their home?
by Mrs Mockingbird
No, we won't get wildlife from the spill. They will be cared for in the Gulf region and released there. To date, the amount of wildlife coming in has been small, but it the oil come ashore, that will all change quickly.

Should we come upon an injured bird or animal, what is the best approach to securing it and getting it hel?
by Sue

Re: the spill, this is so large, we'll be making up new rules as we go along, just to cope with the scale.

The first thing when helping an animal is to protect yourself!! We don't want two patients. Then, do no harm to the patient....(you'd be surprised what we've seen!) The best thing is to call a place like WCV to get advice on how best to capture an animal. A blanket or towel thrown over it is a good technique.

Can the public bring an injured eagle to the Center? If not, what do you recommend they do when finding one?
by Cindi
Info is on our website

Mr. Clark, how is Buddy doing and what will you need to make certain his enclosure is as best as he can be provided?
by DiMcK

If you find an eagle in Virginia, we STRONGLY recommend that you call first, or notify the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Eagles can do a lot of damage to someone without the proper skills and experience.

Buddy is doing fine. We have not finalized the cage design, but I anticipate it will need to be 50-75 feet in length and maybe 15 feet high, to allow Buddy room to spread his wings and fly. Again, though, design is not finalized.

My question has to do with Buddy. If he is successfully integrated as an educational eagle, will you use him for general eagle education or specifically for the issue of Avian Pox ?
by Sandi
What role does Buddy play? Is he used for educating children ?
by JoAnne in VA
How is Buddy doing with his training for education purposes?
by Goldenrule
Can you give us an update on how Buddy is doing with his glove training?
by Lesley
Okay, re: Buddy, we will use him for general education, not for avian pox presentations, though that will be mentioned. He will have to progress in his ability to sit on a glove, though he is doing very well. We will use him for audiences of all ages, I'm sure, assuming he gets to the point of traveling.

When will Buddy be able to meet the public who come to WCV?
by DiMcK
what skills does an eagle need before going ot in public?
by crackerjack
The public can see Buddy now, during our regularly scheduled open houses, and will be able to see him in the future. However, WCV is a hospital, not a nature center or zoo, so access to Buddy will still be on a scheduled basis, not open for drop-in visitors. As for the new cage, while we have not finalized the cage design, we anticipate the construction costs will be about $25,000. Since Buddy is fully flighted, he will need room to spread his wings!

Buddy will need to be able to tolerate a lot of stimulation and crowds before he'll be taken on the road


I saw some of the pictures of Buddy when he first arrived. What procedures did you go through to determine his treatment and the decision to not release him?
Also, were you able to straighten his beak?
by Cindi
Okay, give me a minute to fully answer this..... Buddy's story is long and involved.

Let me give you a chronology:

June 2008. The lesion continued to grow for several weeks while the bird’s immune system gradually was built up and was able to fight the virus. An MRI examination revealed that the tumor-like lesion was not only on the outside, but had been growing inside the skull as well. Surgical removal was the only option. In the meantime, the beak had begun to become misshapen because the growth was right over the growth plate—like the base of a fingernail—causing the left side to grow more slowly than the right, thus pushing the tip of the upper beak to the left.

July 9. By the end of June, the Center veterinary and rehabilitation staff noticed a gradual but sustained shrinkage of the Avian Pox lesion on the side of the eagle’s beak. On July 9, staff found that the remainder of the lesion had fallen off.
July 12. The Center’s veterinary team operated on the eagle – to clean out the remnants of the pox lesion and to repair damage to bone and beak tissue. To assist, the Center brought in Dr. R. Avery Bennett, Professor of Veterinary Clinical Medicine at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and known internationally for his surgical skills in complicated cases.
July 15. Since admission, the eagle had been housed inside the Center’s clinic, principally in the isolation unit [to prevent spread of Avian Pox to other bird patients]. On July 15, the eagle was moved to one of the Center’s outdoor pens.
August 1. Because of damage caused by the Avian Pox lesion to the growth plates of the eagle’s beak, the beak grows out unevenly, producing a crossed bill. On August 1, the eagle was brought back into the clinic for the first in a series of beak trims, establishing a treatment procedure that will continue regularly as the beak continues its growth pattern.
August 2008 – August 2009. The eagle continued to be housed in some of the Center’s outdoor pens, including significant periods in the largest, 100-foot flight pen. Center rehabilitation staff monitored the bird’s status daily; Center veterinarians completed a formal evaluation every week. Every two to three weeks, on an as-needed basis, the bird’s beak was trimmed.
August 24, 2009. The Center announced that #08-0887 had been declared a non-releasable bird. That decision was “[b]ased on a review of the bird’s treatment over the past 15 month, evaluation of the curvature of the eagle’s beak, and the habituation of this young bird to humans.” That decision was based in part of a formal evaluation of #08-0887 prepared by Dr. Dave McRuer, Center Director of Veterinary Services, that noted that the eagle’s beak “has not straightened as we would have hoped. At this point, it appears that, despite our best attempts, the germinal cells of the left side of the upper beak have been permanently altered. … It is our professional opinion that, due to these apparently permanent changes to the beak, lifelong management will be necessary in order for this eagle to thrive. If the bird were to be released, the beak would continue to grow until he could no longer open or close the mouth. This undoubtedly would result in the eagle’s eventual starvation and death.”


Let's give everyone a minute to read this
by Congowings

yes, gladly. This was lifted from the press release we did about Buddy. The full text is on our WCV website

What do you with the unreleasable eagles? Are you able to house them at your center?
by NatureLover
Is there always a permamanet home for eagles at your center if they cannot be released back into the wild due to permanent injury? (Like Buddy)
by Charlene
Most of the time, honestly, if a bird cannot be returned to the wild, and especially with a severe injury, it is euthanized. We do not keep animals that cannot be released, unless they have potential use in education programs.

What are Buddy's most outstanding features or personalities?
by BarbRN
With Buddy, the fact that he has such a "fan club" makes him a good vehicle for education. The fact that he has been handled and manipulated so much make him tolerate people, a rare trait for bald eagles

Once Buddy can tolerate travel and crowds, will you consider using him in fund-raising events? (perhaps around the state)
by nancy

Many eagles cannot tolerate captivity

When/if Buddy goes on the road, he will be eligible for use in all sorts of events. With my previous eagle partners, I have been to the White House several times, on TV countless times, and was the annual keynote speaker at an environmental awards event at the Pentagon.

An eagle is like having the passkey to the halls of power!


how do you decide whether to send an eagle to Dollywood or keep him?
by crackerjack edited by Congowings
We rarely send eagles to Dollywood...maybe only once or twice in our history. It has to be a bird that is relatively in good physical condition and able to tolerate crowds. They have finite space, so there are more eagles than they can handle.

What can the public do to help fund Buddy's enclosure?
by DiMcK
We anticipate the cost to be in the neighborhood of $25,000, but the design is still being worked outWe will have a special fund established

are some bird species compatible for sharing enclosures, and others not to be together?
by crackerjack
Many birds, including eagles can share space. It is often a matter of management.....putting in lots of food in different areas of the cage for example

what other kinds of animals have found permanent homes at the wildlife center
by maudie

BTW,..... Garden of Eagles calendars and "Buddy Bucks" will help with the cage when built.

Right now, we have about 20 education animals, more or less....mostly raptors. We have a golden eagle, a couple of hawks, 4 or 5 owls, a collection of snakes and turtles and three opossums
.

what proportion of contributions come in targeted for a single patient?
by crackerjack
We generally do not accept such specific earmarks, because accounting for the expenditure is often more costly than the amount of the contribution. We do, however, have special funds for special patients, like Buddy. Otherwise, we accept gifts for patient care, research, education, etc.

Where do we send the funds for the "Buddy Bucks" ?
You can actually donate online at http://www.wildlifecenter.org or send a check to WCV at PO Box 1557, Waynesboro, VA 22980.....just mark the check "Buddy Bucks" and it will go into the eagle piggybank.

Didn't I understand that people could donate an extra $5 when ordering the Garden of Eagles calendar and that goes directly to Buddy and his new enclosure?
by Goldenrule

A lot of this info is on our website....

That extra $5 is what "Buddy Bucks" are...... Some folks have given much more, so don't let that $5 figure hold you back.....there is no limit.....as long as your check will clear the bank!
;o)


will buddy ever have a mate?
by atgquits1

Some folks are giving monthy

It is unlikely that Buddy will have a mate....for two reasons. First, he has only ever known humans. We don't think he is what would technically be called "imprinted" on humans, but he's very habituated. The other thing is that once mated, he would be lost for education
.

Do you have 501C3 status?
by JoAnne in VA

Many eagles are solitray, so don't call Oprah just yet!

We are a 501(c)(3) organization, yes.


can the public help with construction of Buddy's cage? I know some who will be willing to travel if help is needed
by John in NJ

All gifts are deductible to the maximum extent allowed.

When we are ready to build, we may well have a cage raising. However, in the meantime, our big eagle flight cage is out of use because of the need to make repairs. If folks have construction skills, they can help now
!


If there were enough funding, is there space for a longer than 75 ft enclosure? Would too much space be dangerous due to build up of speed in flight?
by Cary
We are not constrained by money alone. We don't have unlimited space. We want to provide Buddy adequate room, but this is not going to be a spa....it is an education animal cage. It would not do us much good to have a cage so large that visitors could not see him when they tour..... or in which we would have trouble catching him when he needs to tour!

Mr.Clark When do you anticipate beginning with the building and encloser being complete roughly?
by sweetysmommy

Between now and then....we're just too busy with patients coming in.

Mr. Clark, what patient number are you up to this year and what percentage of your patients are eagles?
by IndyLynne
So far in 2010, we have received 15 bald eagles (14 alive and 1 DOA) and 899 patients in all.

At this time last year, we had admitted 22 eagles. This could be explained by a lot of things, including the weather. People were not out finding eagles during the blizzard, for example.


would it be possible to have "on-line" rehab classes
by Dixie via edited by Congowings

Timing will depend on money, first and foremost. We will not begin until late summer, at the earliest, but when we start, it should not take too long to finish. It will probably be more like putting up a huge tent, than actually building a building.

We are actually considering that very thing. We have a whole list of classes we teach in Virginia, but we want to extend our reach. Right now, the International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council (IWRC) has some classes online, but they are limited. In the new strategic plan on which we are now working, that is on our list


Mr. Clark...do you think the increase in eagle population is the cause for the fights over territory???
by Sioux via edited by Congowings

Class list is on the website

Absolutely.... the population has grown into a small remnant of traditional habitat. If that habitat shrinks, so will the population. For now, they are fighting over the space that is left!

In 1970, we only had about 30 nests. Today we have over 700


With managed treatment, is Buddy able to eat or does he require a special diet such as ground meat or fish?
by Cindi via edited by Congowings
We must trim Buddy's beak every 6-8 weeks, but with that care, he can feed himself. In the wild, without the trimming, the beak would over-grow and eventually kill him.

Could it be that the loss of habitat is causing more eagle fights?
by Brenda
Yes.... fights are over territory or food. If you have lots of territory and plenty of food, there is no need to fight. Food is doing okay, but habitat along rivers and tidal estuaries is being developed rapidly. What's left is the subject of the battles

will eagles nest and raise young in captivity
by EdA
Under some circumstances, yes, but we will not be doing that here. It takes a lot of dedicated space and the birds must be left undisturbed. Frankly, there is no real need for this anymore. There are plenty of eagles in most areas. We fix the broken ones. We are not in the business of producing new ones

Could the number of eagles/nests go down with the Eagles off the endangered list now?
by Annie
We hope not, but the possiblity exists. Under ESA, eagles and habitats were protected. Without the protection of the ESA, only the birds and nests are protected. We are very concerned, as is the US Fish and Wildlife Service

I think the work that you are doing at the Center is beyond amazing and I am so glad people DO care. All animals are special and derserve wellness. Do you have more volunteers or more vets?
by Kara via edited by Congowings
Some things that were once prohibited in eagle habitat will now be allowed

You are very kind. I'm very fortunate to have a team of people here who are second to none. I tell people that my main job is to hire the best in the world, then stay out of their way!


when you get requests for appearances or presentations, do they request any specific animal?
by crackerjack

We are at the end of our hour, but if there are more questions I can stick around for a while.....

What organizations can we support that have been successful in protection of habitat?
by Cary via edited by Congowings

When we get requests for a specific animal, we'll consider them, but we make the call based on a lot of things.....the animals, who is available and what the topic is. I used to get lots of calls to come "show" an eagle, but we don't decorate meeting rooms....we either give a full presentation or we generally don't go. I even turned down the President one time!

Certainly, the Nature Conservancy is good, as are some of the local land trusts. Each state has different groups and different issues. Here in Virginia, the Center of Conservation Biology can target critical habitat, then DGIF and TNC will often help out to protect it
.


do the doctors who intern with you go on to domestic pet practice, or to wildlife practice?
by crackerjack
Many of our students--4th year of vet school-- go into private practice, but nearly all of our postdoctoral interns and residents have gone into widlife medicine, research or teaching

I see so many hurt eagles from eating lead from bullets,what if any can people do to ban lead ammunition?
by Mike
Interesting you mention that. Today, we are starting a new research project with a number of wildlife hospitals nationwide. The study is being coordinated by The Raptor Center at the Univ. of MN. We will all be testing every eagle, loon, swan and vulture coming in to specifically look for evidence of lead intoxication. We are trying to compile the case over the next year.

The study will run for a year


I have heard that the Center wants to provide more public accessability for Buddy. Where do you anicipate building this new enclosure that the public has access but it doesnt interfere with real purpose of the Center or endanger Buddy?
by sweetysmommy via edited by Congowings
We have two issues: One is space and the other is purpose. We have limited room for spacious exhibit cages in our animal enclosure area. We are not a zoo, so our enclosures are not intended to impress visitors, but to meet the needs of our patients and permanent residents, including Buddy. He is a celebrity, but we are not going to fundamentally change our priorities, even to accommodate him. His cage will be ample in size, and may be large enough for more than one eagle—the can share space with no problem. However, our first order of business is returning eagles who can fly to the wild.

Can you tell us some of the things that will be allowed now that were not under ESA?
by JoAnne in VA via edited by Congowings

We may increase the frequency of open house dates, however

For example, under ESA, there was no allowable "take" of bald eagles, for any reason. Now, wind turbines, development, power lines, and other human activities can be allowed in eagle habitat with specific numbers of eagles that can be killed, injured or displaced. USFWS is struggling with the permit issues.


do you band birds before you release them?
by crackerjack
yes, all eagles are banded with both the federal band and a state research band. We soon hope to put wing tags on as well that can be seen from great distances. We are waiting for them to come in now.

Are any conservation societies such as the Nature Conservancy trying to buy waterfront property to protect it for the eagles?
by Brenda
There are a number of organizations trying to acquire or protect waterfront property. Buying is not the only way to protect it. Conservation easements are also becoming more popular. A landowner donates or sells the development rights to land. You keep your land, but you can never subdivide it or change its basic character

Is the Center in need of drivers from the Va. Beach/Norfolk area to take eagles in need of attention to Waynesboro?
by Roy
We often need transporters. The thing to do is to call our front desk and get the full details. We need transport for other animals as well, quite often.

Does Avian Pox infect an entire clutch?
by NatureLover
Avian Pox is more or less endemic....that is, out there all the time. Most birds are able to defend against it with normal immune response.... let me explain why I think Buddy was infected......

Birds develop their immunity to pathogens after they are hatched, in part by ingesting the saliva and mildly contaminated things. When eagle chicks are normally hatched—late February to mid-March there is not as much mosquito activity as there is at the end of April, when Buddy emerged. So, I am guessing that it is mainly an issue of when he was hatched. However, contamination and pollutants in Virginia’s tidal rivers does affect the immune system of all the creatures that depend on the aquatic ecosystem for food and habitat.


Where did the Golden Eagle come from and some of his story please Mr. Clark
by maudie
Junior, our golden eagle, was my partner for many years, actually living at home with me when I used to do hundreds of appearances annually. He was found in Merced, CA with badly damaged feather and leather anklets...obviously from illegal captivity. He was about six years old, and hopelessly imprinted. He was taken to the San Diego Wild Animal Park and they sent him to me..... in 1985. He is 27 now

Do you mean all eagles in VA are banded or all of them in USA?
by Annie via edited by Congowings

In case you wonder about my math....I got him in 1985, after he'd be at SDWAP for about a year and a half

The eagles we get as patients are banded. Many of the eagles hatched in Virginia are banded by the Center for Conservation Biology and other groups, but there are many, many eagles in VA that are not banded


what percentage of eagles come in previously banded?
by crackerjack
Very few, but we do get some. We had one from Northern Neck, VA that had been banded in a hacking program 27 years earlier. She was a REALLY old eagle!!

is it true that Golden Eagles are larger than the Balds?
by Gretchen edited by Congowings
No, that is not generally true. They are different species and have different body shapes and wing size. In weight, they are generally about the same size, although a golden may have a somewhat larger wingspan. Eagles soar, but often hunt from perches. Goldens hunt from the wing, so they need more lift. Also, their respective habitats require different adaptations

Could the Golden Eagle and Buddy be in the same cage?
by JoAnne in VA

With the announcement of possibly drilling on the east coast, what measures are you taking now to plan for a possible spill like in the Gulf?
by Elkhart
Honestly, it is not possible to plan for something of that magnitude. For us, we get oiled animals, but in small numbers. The two groups of our colleagues currently work in the Gulf are the best in the world, so we'll rely upon them. I don't think we'll be seeing drilling off Virginia anytime soon.

Dr. Clark, wasn't there previouse mention of the possibility that a special N.E.S.T.I open house might be offered next year?
by IndyLynne
First....I'm not a "Dr.".... We have four folks on staff with that title, but I'm not one of them.

Second....we are considering it


Mr. Clark , Have you always been interested in birds? All kind of birds or just raptors? What education is required for you center?
by lightnn in NJ via edited by Congowings

There are no specific plans or dates yet

Yes, I have always been a "nature boy". In fact, I spent the weekend at my little rustic cabin in the mountains of PA. I love the outdoors...but fortunately, I love people too. There are no specific classes or courses that will get you in our door. We have vets, technicians, teachers, business experts, biologists and others who all play their part. If I had to say the one thing they all have in common is the ability to communicate effectively about their passion and our work.


Have you ever cared for any of the eagles at Busch Gardens? Thank you for your wonderful insight today.
by Murph via edited by Congowings

What you know does not matter if you cannot communicate it

Yes, we work closely with Busch Gardens on the care of the birds there. Most are actually owned and managed by a group in California, called Zoo to You. They are fine folks


How long does it usually take for a rescued animal to be released from your center?
by NatureLover via edited by Congowings

Busch Conservation Fund helps with our eagle work, as well.

Some animals are here for a few days, others for over a year. The average is about six weeks, I think, but I'd have to confirm with the vet staff


When the golden eagle lived in your home, what did you feed it?
by Kara
Junior did not live "in" my home....he would have trashed the place! He had a large aviary in the yard. He ate mouse-cicles and rat-cicles....
....that woud be frozen rodents....


In the past, the WCV has had "needs" for special foods...are there any shortages currently? Is that ever posted on your web-site?
by nancy
I think our "wish list" is on the website and stays pretty current. I don't know of critical needs at the moment, at least not for any specific food. We go through a whole lot of goat's milk with deer fawns each year, so if you have a herd of goats, we should talk....

Are you for us ordinary people feeding our backyard birds with bird feeders? - Does that make a difference?
by Kara
I have about five feeders on my deck. As long as you are feeding high quality food, keeping your feeders clean, and keeping your cats indoors, I see nothing wrong with feeding the birds. Some purists don't like it, and there are a lot of things people can do in the process of feeding that can be a problem, but good food and clean feeders is a big step

We have an eagles nest about 100 feet from our home, and they have been using it for several years. Why does it not bother them to have all the human activity around them? Is it because they are used to the human activity?
by Judy in Washington State
We have found that some eagles "learn" that it is okay to be around humans. In Florida, there are eagles nesting right in trailer parks, for example. But, them being willing to be there, and it being a good spot are not the same thing.

does an eagle bond easily with humans? like how was it between Junior and you?
by somistyblue via edited by Congowings

Proximity to humans means more proximity to human-related problems

Hmmm.... how to answer that. Junior did not "bond" with me, as such. He came to tolerate me when he would not tolerate anyone else. When I first got him, he was very agressive. We worked that out....hurt Ed and you don't get dinner.... but he would have escaped if give the chance....actually did three times! That was nightmare!


Mr. Clark, would the siblings be likely to mate with each other such as Azalea and one from this group?
by JoAnne in VA
I don't think I'm the best one to answer that... It is possible but probably not likely, just based on the odds. They won't even be old enough to mate for five years, and one or both may have been lost or simply found another place to be by then.

_________________
For the animals shall not be measured by man ~ They are not our brethren, they are not underlings: they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendor and travail of the earth ~ Henry Beston


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Q&A Transcript
PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 3:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 2:52 pm
Posts: 3811
Location: VA Beach
I was hoping you would do this.

Thanks, Ann . . I couldn't keep up with it all while at work :? .

Looks like Ed did another outstanding job of educating, enlightening & entertaining . . .as usual. 8-)

Hope he knows how much it is appreciated. Hope someone gives him a link here :mrgreen:

_________________
http://www.pbase.com/coastalva


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Q&A Transcript
PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 4:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 7:50 pm
Posts: 3913
Location: Shenandoah Valley
How did you get Junior back?
by JoAnne in VA
Fortunately, I kept Junior on a long tether. When he left, he was wearing it. He got tangled up in the bushes. The first time, he landed in a chest-high cornfield. I was wearing shorts when I had to go in to catch him. My legs were torn to shreds

What are the most plentiful types of owls in central Virginia? Are any owls endangered and if so, what is being done to improve their populations?
by Pink Floyd
We have lots of Great-horned owls and screech owls, but about five other species as well. Barred owls and barn owls come in 3rd and 4th
We also have long-earred, short-earred, saw-whet, and the rare snowy owl


hi ed, i am on the environmnetal commission on pt. pleasant, nj and we had eagles try to nest in a bird sancuar in an osprey(man made) they decided it was not a good spot and left. is there anything we can do to try to get them back. we tried fencing off the property but i think human contact might have been the issue.
by sheryl
Typically, an osprey nest platform is not high enough. There has been little success in attracting eagle with artificial nest sites, I'm afraid.

Do you foresee attaching such monitoring devices to multiple eaglets in the future or are they just too costly?
by Pink Floyd
Not my call.... that will have to be directed to the Game Department. We have nothing to do with that. Cost is a big issue, however.

Mr. Clark, thanks for all that you do. What encouraged you to choose your profession with the Wildlife center. Was it one specific thing?
by Blissie
I have always loved nature. In college, my favorite area in the George Washington National Forest was clearcut. I was mad as hell, but honestly did not even know at whom to be mad at the time. It was a valuable lesson that if you don't take care of what you love, it willgo away.

Where is the Wildlife Center?
by Cheryl
The Wildlife Center of Virginia is located in Waynesboro, Virginia, in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley. People often ask, "why there?" Because I co-founded the place. It was where I lived at the time, and I didn't want to commute!
We adjoin the aforementioned GW national forest


does the bald eagle have a predator?
Cathy from South Jersey
Yes, eggs and young birds are preyed upon by raccoons, ravens and other raptors. Not much will mess with adult birds, unless they are injured or compromised in some way. However, if they are injured, they are vulnerable to a wide range of predators.

For Mr. Clark are there stats that show how eagles who fledge from hack towers do compared to others who fledge from nests are they less likely to survive to maturity?
by Kay
I do not know about specific studies, but I’m sure there have been post-release studies of hacked birds. My assumption is that birds from hack towers have a higher survival rate since they have food and medical care until they are old enough to fledge. Some programs continue to provide food for the birds, even after they are released. The survival rate for chicks in the wild is lower than you would expect. Only about half of the eggs laid ever produce birds that leave the nest. Buddy was the only survivor out of five eggs laid by his parents in 2009, and he would have died if we had not gotten him.

What determines sex of eaglets? The male as in humans ?
by White Panther
Yes, basically it is the same process....though I'll defer to a genetics expert on that.

Have any studies been done that estimate how many eaglets might have died for lack of food after they have fledged?
by curious
The survival rate for eagles is pretty low. Only about one in four—maybe one in three—eagle fledglings will make it to adulthood. Inability to feed themselves is certainly one reason, but we see lots of other problems, including collisions with cars and power lines, gunshot, environmental contamination, and disease.

I was wondering, since we will use proceeds from calendar sales this year to build a bigger enclosure for Buddy, what is the possiblity and potential extra cost for making this enclosure a "double wide" in the event there is ever another eagle able to fly at the Wildlife Center. Plus I believe Junior can fly. Maybe he could be Buddy's next door neighbor if the enclosure was wide enough with a seperation down the middle? Any thoughts on this
by John
I have already touched on most of this. We don't have the space for eagle-rama. We want a cage big enough, but not overpowering to the rest of our enclosure area. And Junior will not be moving in

My daughter in law's parents visited Dollywood last year and saw the eagles there. He talks about one that could fly getting his talon caught in the mesh and having to have "keeper" go in and get talon loose. I know the enclosure in North Carolina Raptor Center uses the mesh. Is this a concern for birds there or was that just a freak thing at DOllywood? I also dont know what he considers "mesh". Could be the chain link stuff and not truely mesh. Is the mesh material being considered for the enclosures at the Center?
by sweetysmommy
I have visited both of those facilities. Both have very nice cages. Mesh or netting material is frequently used for large birds, but there are problems if you have a very easily agitated eagle. They will grab the material and then twist around, causing them to get tangled. However, there are ways to deal with this, but simply hanging the netting with more tension, preventing the twisting. It is a trade-off. We have cages in which eagles cannot get tangled, but they are made of wood. You cannot see what’s inside. We will keep Buddy safe, but we also want people to see him when they are allowed to visit.

Have any of your released eagles been found alive and well?
by flynflower
Yes. We have had eagles treated in our hospital and breed the very next season. One big female from a pair nesting near West Point, VA produced triplets, just a few months after being returned to her territory and mate following a collision with a truck. Another young bird was treated here then found in NC a year later.

The new research tags will help with follow-up


So what can the average resident do to help the eagles in general, as in using less high nitrogen fertilizer and only fertilizing at the correct time etc.?
by tgar
Minimizing the use of pesticides and fertilizers helps all wildlife, not just eagles--and people too, as we are seeing in the news this week. Urging local governments to protect riparian habitat from development is also important. While the eagle population is rebounding and growing steadily, in many areas there is not much habitat left into which the growing population can move. If that habitat is further diminished, the population will fall again, as well.

What parasites do eagles struggle with and how do they handle them (e.g. fleas, mites}
by Blueskies
Most parasites of eagles are acquired through their food. The major internal parasites will include a host of roundworms or tapeworms. Most worms are acquired through fish and complete one stage of the lifecycle in the bird. For the most part, the parasites do not affect the bird’s health and mostly feed on nutrition within the GI tract. Some parasites will attach to the inner lining of the stomach or intestine and draw nutrients from the birds blood or lymph.

Blood parasites are also fairly common. These include avian malaria, and 2 other parasites of the white and red blood cells. As long as the bird’s immune function is adequate, these blood parasites don’t create a major problem. If the immune system is compromised (young and developing, affected by toxins such or pesticides, etc) then the parasites can evade the immune system and reproduce in large numbers. This can definitely affect the health of the bird.

The most common external parasites include feather lice and some mite species. Feather lice are generally chewing lice and physically can destroy the feathers. Again, these mites aren’t generally harmful unless in large numbers. Eagles can rarely carry ticks that transmit other diseases (Lyme Disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, etc.) but this is fairly uncommon.

I'll give credit to our head vet for that answer!


Buddy had avian pox that was transmitted via mosquito, right? Is it a guess to say that somehow his immunity was compromised and that contributed to his picking it up? I know that there is lots of water and thereby mosquitos still in the vicinity, so why wouldn't the current eaglets be susceptible as well?
by coot
I touched on this a bit earlier.... Birds develop their immunity to pathogens after they are hatched, in part by ingesting the saliva and mildly contaminated things. When eagle chicks are normally hatched—late February to mid-March there is not as much mosquito activity as there is at the end of April, when Buddy emerged. So, I am guessing that it is mainly an issue of when he was hatched. However, contamination and pollutants in Virginia’s tidal rivers does affect the immune system of all the creatures that depend on the aquatic ecosystem for food and habitat.

have any workers been bitten by an eagle
by wildcat
being bitten by an eagle is nothing. Being grabbed by their feet is another matter. They can generate 500 pounds of pressure in their grip. I would have to know you pretty well to show you all my scars, but on set was Juniors talons going all the way through my wrist!! (pretty much answers the bonding question) However, every time I have been injured, or someone else has been, it has been our mistake, not the bird's fault
well.....I did get bitten in the face on TV during a release.... That was pretty embarrassing.....and bloody....


Are eagles exclusively fresh water hunters? I was wondering how the oil spill might affect those living on the gulf coasts?
by Amy edited by Congowings
No, eagles are not exclusively freshwater hunters. They will take salt water and brackish water fish as well. They are very opportunistic feeders

My nephew has been spending time photographing eagles/eaglets in PA, NJ, NY in pretty rural areas. What is the best thing you can say to people who live near a nest to help them offer protection, such as in regard to the use of guns? Any advice?
by Lilybelle
I am an gun collector and shooter, and even though I don't hunt much anymore, I never use lead bullets for hunting. Eagles scavenge anything dead. If they happen to swallow the remains of an animal that has been shot, the shards of lead can kill an eagle in 48 hours, as it passes through the digestive system. The noise of guns can be disruptive during nesting season as well.

Ed this question is about your annual fundraiser. I know each year you look for unique items to auction. Can you give us an idea of what kinds of items you look for?
by Sandi
Our annual fundraiser will be the November 6. We have a silent auction and a live auction. We generally like to have original items or things that you can't just go buy for yourself. This could be original artwork, use of vacation homes, a trip on somebody's sailboat, etc. We are very creative. If you have an idea, call or email Kristin Sluiter, who is in charge of the event

If you would like to come, let her know as well.....black tie and very nice!


How often do you have to turn away rescued animals because of space at the center? I assume you are quite full most of the time since more people are concerned with helping injured animals that they find.
by NatureLover edited by Congowings
We have never turned away an animal because of space limitations. We have transfered patients to others, but in almost 28 years, we have never refused to admit or find help for a wild animal that was in need of our care. A lot of places have that problem, but we have trained others to help. Healthy animals that may need care....orphans, for example...are transferred

Thank you for this wonderful discussion. What is the most important fact to teach our children about eagles?
by Molly
Every thing we do in our daily lives has a consequence or cost. Every decision we make can have a positive or negative impact. Because we have the opportunity to make a positive difference, we have the responsibility to do so. Other creatures, or other people usually pay for our waste or selfish decisions.

Aren't most owls a lot more agressive and mean than eagles?
by Kara
Aggressive and mean animals are usually human..... Neither owls nor eagles will attack unprovoked. Ounce for ounce, a great-horned owl is a handful. I'm not sure the comparison is valid though
The most assertive birds I know are hummingbirds


Your "Junior" stories would make a GREAT book...we will be waiting for it!
by Judy in Washington State
I have a file on my computer called "Chapters in the book I will probably never write".... Junior figures prominently

It was fun!!! Let's do it again sometime

I'm lucky that I get to represent such an incredible team of people.... I am just the guy out front. They do the hard work. I just get to talk about it.

_________________
For the animals shall not be measured by man ~ They are not our brethren, they are not underlings: they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendor and travail of the earth ~ Henry Beston


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: Q&A Transcript
PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 4:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 7:50 pm
Posts: 3913
Location: Shenandoah Valley
VA_RDH wrote:
Looks like Ed did another outstanding job of educating, enlightening & entertaining . . .as usual. 8-)

Hope he knows how much it is appreciated.

Pete...as you can see, Ed was very generous with his time today and he had a great variety of questions...and lots of them :D

_________________
For the animals shall not be measured by man ~ They are not our brethren, they are not underlings: they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendor and travail of the earth ~ Henry Beston


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 5:25 pm 
Offline
Photographer
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 6:06 pm
Posts: 2415
Location: VA Beach, VA
WOW!! So glad you did this Ann - have to come back & finish ready - Ed really did a great job & as valuable as his time is, I'm sue it was special to so many people for him to take this time.

_________________
Shelly - http://shellyva.smugmug.com/
and for older pics visit http://www.pbase.com/shellyva


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 7:39 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 2:52 pm
Posts: 3811
Location: VA Beach
Shelly wrote:
WOW!! So glad you did this Ann - have to come back & finish ready - Ed really did a great job & as valuable as his time is, I'm sue it was special to so many people for him to take this time.

what were drinking when you wrote this, Shell??? :lol:

I took this quote & pasted it to my FB page with a link to WCV, I liked it so much.
It wasn't an original idea to do so, but I have no idea who thought of it first :roll:
"Every thing we do in our daily lives has a consequence or cost. Every decision we make can have a positive or negative impact. Because we have the opportunity to make a positive difference, we have the responsibility to do so. Other creatures, or other people usually pay for our waste or selfish decisions. "
ETA:I forgot the above quote in the original post . . . that must have made a lot of sense initially :roll: :lol:

_________________
http://www.pbase.com/coastalva


Last edited by VA_RDH on Tue Jun 01, 2010 11:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 10:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2009 7:47 pm
Posts: 1077
Location: North Riverside, IL
Ann, thanks for posting the transcript from today's chat with Ed. He sure was generous with his time and his knowledge. Wish I could have been on the chat at the time, but work kind of gets in the way sometimes. :lol: However, I enjoyed reading the transcript and certainly learned some things.

To Ed Clark - thanks for taking the time to educate us all.

Violet :)

_________________
Proud Member of N.E.S.T.International


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 2:23 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2009 3:29 am
Posts: 74
Location: San Antonio, TX
Ann..Thanks so much for posting the transcript of Ed's talk!!! I'm embarrassed to admit that even though I wrote down the time and date thst I forgot about it! :oops: I'm so glad to be able to read it here! Thanks to Ed for all of his time and wonderful answers. :D

_________________
Proud member of N.E.S.T.I.!!!


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 6:23 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 4:24 pm
Posts: 319
Know am a bit late in reading this .. just found it .. but it was lovely to read it and learn a bit more . thanks for taking the time .. had intended to be there live .... but side tracked till to late .. lol

_________________
Proud member of NESTI group

Angels walk with us always


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
POWERED_BY
[ Time : 0.091s | 13 Queries | GZIP : Off ]